Silent Voice

£5.00

including MRSA and POETRY
By Heather Robinson

ISBN: 978-1-84747-299-1
Published: 2007
Pages: 31
Key Themes: OCD, anorexia, eating disorder, psychology, poetry

Description

The book is by no means medical. It was written by someone who developed a condition called OCD at seven years old which in turn led to anorexia nervosa at fifteen years old. Deciding to leave the medical route and rehab behind, Heather Robinson instead travelled and looked for different ways to combat and contradict the demons she lived with. Through writing Silent Voice she unravelled her thoughts and was able to see exactly how to change her life around. The book is completely factual but all the names have been changed. Think of it as a self-help book, but written by someone who knows and feels and has lived the life in the book as opposed to someone who reads textbooks for a living.

About the Author

Heather Robinson is now 22, a gym instructor working in London. She has been involved in fundraising, sports events and mental health documentaries trying to create awareness about the mis-diagnosis currently in the NHS. Originally from Leeds she developed anorexia nervosa as a secondary illness to OCD. The conditions worked hand in hand for six years until finally she worked out her own strategies to repair the mental and physical damage done. She writes, is a keen poet, loves music, dance, sport, running, clubbing, outdoor pursuits and socialising. One day she hopes to open a sports clinic for addictions.

Book Extract

Sat there, looking out of the window, silent. Her eyes were sore, but now dead and emotionless from days of crying. She now had what she wanted, but didn’t know whether it had been the right decision. Anyway, there was no going back now.

The past six months had been hell for Helen. Now sixteen, just, she had only been clubbing with her girlfriends the week before. Now here she was in a secure room, being watched in an adolescent mental health unit.

Her dad had just visited, but she had asked him to leave when becoming too hysterical to hold a conversation. She wasn’t afraid, wasn’t in danger by the people she was now controlled and monitored by, but refused to admit to herself that someone else could tell her things about her own mind that she couldn’t understand or work out for herself.

It had started as long ago as she could remember; Seven years old and a very happy, popular child. Her eyes as deep blue as her fathers and long dark hair just like her mother.

She remembered with flashbacks how the nanny that looked after her and her brother threw her across the room with frustration. Her head flinched as she remembered hitting the floor. She never shared this with anyone as when she attempted to try, she saw no way that the six foot woman who was in charge of her childcare could not somehow manipulate her accusations to her favour.

In giving up on trust, she started counting anything and everything. Daring herself to steal and swear when no one could hear, it was a way of keeping some form of control, some sort of secret between her and her own mind. However, now it was her own mind that had turned against her and trust was necessary in her recovery.

The weight loss didn’t happen until a year ago. Having learnt to control the counting and routines, she went to secondary school again, a very popular and happy teenager.

“Be careful how high you climb, as the fall is a lot further and faster at the top.” The words of her head of year, Mr Monty now rung in her ears making sense for the first time.

The past four years had been a walk in the park. Girls nights out, no serious exams yet, testing everything that life threw her way, like any other hedonistic teen.

She had managed to put behind her that fateful night when, at eleven years old, her cousin had managed to get his way with her in bed. She vowed to herself then that sex would never be on the agenda before marriage, and men would never be allowed to take advantage again.

Having stayed true to this, just before her sixteenth birthday, the testing time would come again. Most of her friends had long since lost their virginity having hung round with the older lads in town for a while.

Not Helen though, “if I sleep with you, you will soon forget about me and lose all your respect. We would not be having this conversation if I had have slept with you.” That is what she said to the lad she had been seeing ever since the topic cropped up.

Tonight was slightly different though.


  • Model: e-book
  • 132 Units in Stock

Please Choose:

pdf e-book





This product was added to our catalog on Thursday 06 September, 2007.

Customers who bought this product also purchased...