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Ouch my head, my aching heart and soul

£12.00

Susan Ilsley

ISBN: 978-1-78382-6209
Published: 2021
Pages: 120
Key Themes: A Guide to The Mental Health System

Description

It really is an attempt to allow Joe Public to explore what is basically a myth, i.e. that there is a UK mental health system that is in line with 21st century thinking and its purpose is to help all those poor souls who suffer from mental health issues. Well, here is the kicker: we all have mental health issues; we exist on a spectrum of mental and emotional health and it is called Life and because we are all born into various circumstances of class, wealth, educational opportunity, family etc. we all have different ideas about what we get to choose and what is just handed out to us. I think people deserve so much more than to be handed out care and support, advice and information on the basis of a post code lottery, or whether by dint of birth you believe you believe the professional expert knows better than you what is helpful and what is not.

I have witnessed too many good ideas and wonderful reviews and reports disappear into the annuls of history e.g. Norman Lamb and personal mental health budgets and the wonderful Stockport pilot 2013, ( https://mentalhealthpartnerships.com/personal-health-budget-sites/), Lord Adebowale 2005, ( https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/jt200405/jtselect/jtment/79/50126a04.htm) . There is been an awful lot of talking since these reports but if you visit a forensic ward or have to navigate your local mental health trust for yourself, or a loved one, you would be hard pushed to imagine that these conversations, reviews, pilots ever happened and why? That old question again, well, it is because they are never in the public domain, they remain in house among the professional experts.

As a child I probably drove my mum and dad nuts with my endless, whys?, how's?, what for?. As an adult I think Occams Razor. Occams Razor, put simply, states: the simplest solution is almost always the best. It's a problem-solving principle arguing that simplicity is better than complexity. Named after 14th-century logician and theologian William of Ockham, this theory has been helping many great thinkers for centuries.23 Jul 2020https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam%27s_razor

Go down memory lane and enjoy this fascinating life story of a young woman in the early 1960s.

About the Author


Female, 71 years young and had enough of the talking so just thought I did write it all down. I live a fairly obscure life in a London Suburb. I grew up on stories my dad was very good at making them up and changing them over time. I think people love stories but sometimes they miss the moral or the ethical message. I have that sort of mind that joins up dots and really like things to be simple. A friend was describing how German toilets have become something of a mystery due to technology, a voice decides when you should flush etc ...so technology which I have no objection to if it is helpful, has gone slightly bonkers and the same with science, very definitely appreciate the wonders of scientific advances since I was a child but sometimes I do wonder why simple things become so complicated i.e. Covid is a virus, the common cold is a virus but no-one has bothered to find a cure or a vaccine for the common cold! The childish question why? Well, I guess there is a lot of money in over-the-counter lotions and potions. No doubt someone somewhere will say but the common cold does not kill people but I would beg to differ because when the UK was busy creating the Commonwealth or conquering the world with the Dutch and the French etc., the common cold wiped out millions, so I guess timing is everything.


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  • Model: Paperback
  • 12000 Units in Stock


This product was added to our catalog on Friday 10 December, 2021.