Multiple Sclerosis - Smiling & Hurting

£5.00

By Dorothy M.Mitchell

ISBN: 978-1-84991-652-3
Published: 2012
Pages: 70
Key Themes: Mental Health, Autobiography, Multiple Sclerosis

Description

ĎMultiple Sclerosis - Smiling & Hurtingí is the story of Dorothy M. Mitchell.

Born in a small Yorkshire village just before the Second World War. She remembers vividly being in the air raid shelter as enemy bombs rained down on nearby Bradford and Leeds, the night sky red from fires burning below in the cities and the sound of aircraft above very frightening.

She started work in a cotton mill at the age of fourteen before moving to Evesham in Worcestershire at the age of sixteen with her parents. She maried at eighteen, has two sons and seven grandchildren.

Dorothy was diognosed with Multiple Sclerosis at the age of thirty seven, suffering many relapse and a few near nervous breakdowns.

About the Author

Dorothy M. Mitchell was born in a small Yorkshire village just before the Second World War. She remembers vividly being in the air raid shelter as enemy bombs rained down on nearby Bradford and Leeds, the night sky red from fires burning below in the cities and the sound of aircraft above very frightening. She started work in a cotton mill at the age of fourteen before moving to Evesham in Worcestershire at the age of sixteen with her parents. She maried at eighteen, has two sons and seven grandchildren Dorothy was diognosed with Multiple Sclerosis at the age of thirty seven, suffering many relapse and a few near nervous breakdowns.

Book Extract

THE START OF CHANGE

The train arrived at VICTORIA STATION. The journey had been exciting but I think I was still in shock. This was a foreign place to us. I remember walking in front of Mum along the noisy platform. I was sixteen years old at the time, Brian was fourteen and Sandra was eleven. I had left the cotton mill. Probably it was the best thing. If I had stayed in Yorkshire it would more than likely have been my lifetimeís work for as I mentioned before, most of the older women who had worked in the mill for years were as deaf as posts. That would have no doubt been my fate.

Dad came out of smoke and the people milling around the platform. He put his arms around me. I noticed Mum hanging back. Brian and Sandra rushed to Dadís side. We had all missed him terribly. His words to me gave me a shock ďI donít know what your mother thinks sheís playing at?Ē I remember feeling awkward. What did he mean? I donít think my brother and sister heard what he said. They were just happy to see Dad. He went towards Mum took the case she was carrying and said something but he didnít kiss her. I was beginning to feel a bit scared, this wasnít right.

We walked from the station and Dad called a taxi. We all jumped in. Mum still looking tight faced. After a while we arrived at our destination. Dad had left the posh pub some time earlier, in favour of being the boss of his own social club. Well thatís what we thought! It would come to light at a later time, that Dad had been up to no good with a woman who owned the posh pub. Apparently a well wisher had informed Mum of this fact earlier on with a letter she had sent to her back home! Hence the move, and Mumís tight face! We all got out of the taxi. We were standing in front of a nondescript building with the sign over the club entrance flashing on and off.

Dad paid the taxi fare and ushered us all inside the front door. We stood in a lobby and looked around. To me it didnít seem up to much. Dad opened another door to the side of the lobby. We were shown inside this grotty room. It wasnít very big; there were three beds and a bit more furniture. There was green lino on the floor and there was one small window. What sent alarm bells ringing was that on the windows were steel bars! When I asked Dad what they were for, he said, ďsafety love, itís a bit of a rough area.Ē Well it turned out that Dad had been ill prepared for Mumís determination to make him stand up to his responsibilities. She had decided that enough was enough. Especially after the letter informing Mum about Dadís little dalliance!

Later on in life I realized that life isnít black and white there are many shades, in fact, itís just life! There was no room for Brian or Dad in the small room I was sleeping in with Sandra and Mum, so they slept under the pool table by the side of the dance floor. Brian has mentioned to me lately that he hated the way we were living, and that he had really missed our home in Yorkshire. It has to be said though the kitchen had all the modern conveniences so I suppose that was a bonus.


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This product was added to our catalog on Tuesday 10 January, 2012.